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November 14, 2012
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Stumbled across this today.... Needless to say I'm pretty disturbed now. Good ol' fairytales. I did not create this list; the link to the original content is at the bottom, along with my thoughts. Feel free to leave your thoughts too! I'll be posting a proper update soon so stay tuned.

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The Pied Piper


In the tale of the Pied Piper, we have a village overrun with rats. A man arrives dressed in clothes of pied (a patchwork of colors) and offers to rid the town of the vermin. The villagers agree to pay a vast sum of money if the piper can do it – and he does. He plays music on his pipe which draws all the rats out of the town. When he returns for payment – the villagers won't cough up so the Pied Piper decides to rid the town of children too! In most modern variants, the piper draws the children to a cave out of the town and when the townsfolk finally agree to pay up, he sends them back. In the darker original, the piper leads the children to a river where they all drown (except a lame boy who couldn't keep up). Some modern scholars say that there are connotations of pedophilia in this fairy tale.


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Little Red Riding Hood


The version of this tale that most of us are familiar with ends with Riding Hood being saved by the woodsman who kills the wicked wolf. But in fact, the original French version (by Charles Perrault) of the tale was not quite so nice. In this version, the little girl is a well bred young lady who is given false instructions by the wolf when she asks the way to her grandmothers. Foolishly riding hood takes the advice of the wolf and ends up being eaten. And here the story ends. There is no woodsman – no grandmother – just a fat wolf and a dead Red Riding Hood. The moral to this story is to not take advice from strangers.

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The Little Mermaid


The 1989 version of the Little Mermaid might be better known as "The big whopper!" In the Disney version, the film ends with Ariel the mermaid being changed into a human so she can marry Eric. They marry in a wonderful wedding attended by humans and merpeople. But, in the very first version by Hans Christian Andersen, the mermaid sees the Prince marry a princess and she despairs. She is offered a knife with which to stab the prince to death, but rather than do that she jumps into the sea and dies by turning to froth. Hans Christian Andersen modified the ending slightly to make it more pleasant. In his new ending, instead of dying when turned to froth, she becomes a "daughter of the air" waiting to go to heaven – so, frankly, she is still dead for all intents and purposes.

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Snow White


In the tale of snow white that we are all familiar with, the Queen asks a huntsman to kill her and bring her heart back as proof. Instead, the huntsman can't bring himself to do it and returns with the heart of a boar. Now, fortunately disney hasn't done too much damage to this tale, but they did leave out one important original element: in the original tale, the Queen actually asks for Snow White's liver and lungs – which are to be served for dinner that night! Also in the original, Snow White wakes up when she is jostled by the prince's horse as he carries her back to his castle – not from a magical kiss. What the prince wanted to do with a dead girl's body I will leave to your imagination. Oh – in the Grimm version, the tale ends with the Queen being forced to dance to death in red hot iron shoes!

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Sleeping Beauty


In the original sleeping beauty, the lovely princess is put to sleep when she pricks her finger on a spindle. She sleeps for one hundred years when a prince finally arrives, kisses her, and awakens her. They fall in love, marry, and (surprise surprise) live happily ever after. But alas, the original tale is not so sweet (in fact, you have to read this to believe it.) In the original, the young woman is put to sleep because of a prophesy, rather than a curse. And it isn't the kiss of a prince which wakes her up: the king seeing her asleep, and rather fancying having a bit, rapes her. After nine months she gives birth to two children (while she is still asleep). One of the children sucks her finger which removes the piece of flax which was keeping her asleep. She wakes up to find herself raped and the mother of two kids.

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Rumpelstiltskin


This fair tale is a little different from the others because rather than sanitizing the original, it was modified by the original author to make it more gruesome. In the original tale, Rumpelstiltskin spins straw into gold for a young girl who faces death unless she is able to perform the feat. In return, he asks for her first born child. She agrees – but when the day comes to hand over the kid, she can't do it. Rumpelstiltskin tells her that he will let her off the bargain if she can guess his name. She overhears him singing his name by a fire and so she guesses it correctly. Rumpelstiltskin, furious, runs away, never to be seen again. But in the updated version, things are a little messier. Rumpelstiltskin is so angry that he drives his right foot deep into the ground. He then grabs his left leg and rips himself in half. Needless to say this kills him.

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Goldilocks and the Three Bears

In this heart warming tale, we hear of pretty little goldilocks who finds the house of the three bears. She sneaks inside and eats their food, sits in their chairs, and finally falls asleep on the bed of the littlest bear. When the bears return home they find her asleep – she awakens and escapes out the window in terror. The original tale (which actually only dates to 1837) has two possible variations. In the first, the bears find Goldilocks and rip her apart and eat her. In the second, Goldilocks is actually an old hag who (like the sanitized version) jumps out of a window when the bears wake her up. The story ends by telling us that she either broke her neck in the fall, or was arrested for vagrancy and sent to the "House of Correction".

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Hansel and Gretel


In the widely known version of Hansel and Gretel, we hear of two little children who become lost in the forest, eventually finding their way to a gingerbread house which belongs to a wicked witch. The children end up enslaved for a time as the witch prepares them for eating. They figure their way out and throw the witch in a fire and escape. In an earlier French version of this tale (called The Lost Children), instead of a witch we have a devil. Now the wicked old devil is tricked by the children (in much the same way as Hansel and Gretel) but he works it out and puts together a sawhorse to put one of the children on to bleed (that isn't an error – he really does). The children pretend not to know how to get on the sawhorse so the devil's wife demonstrates. While she is lying down the kids slash her throat and escape.

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The Girl Without Hands


Frankly, the revised version of this fairy tale is not a great deal better than the original, but there are sufficient differences to include it here. In the new version, a poor man is offered wealth by the devil if he gives him whatever is standing behind his mill. The poor man thinks it is an apple tree and agrees – but it is actually his daughter. The devil tries to take the daughter but can't – because she is pure, so he threatens to take the father unless the daughter allows her father to chop off her hands. She agrees and the father does the deed. Now – that is not particularly nice, but it is slightly worse in some of the earlier variants in which the young girl chops off her own arms in order to make herself ugly to her brother who is trying to rape her. In another variant, the father chops off the daughter's hands because she refuses to let him have sex with her.

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Cinderella


In the modern Cinderella fairy tale we have the beautiful Cinderella swept off her feet by the prince and her wicked step sisters marrying two lords – with everyone living happily ever after. The fairy tale has its origins way back in the 1st century BC where Strabo's heroine was actually called Rhodopis, not Cinderella. The story was very similar to the modern one with the exception of the glass slippers and pumpkin coach. But, lurking behind the pretty tale is a more sinister variation by the Grimm brothers: in this version, the nasty step-sisters cut off parts of their own feet in order to fit them into the glass slipper – hoping to fool the prince. The prince is alerted to the trickery by two pigeons who peck out the step sister's eyes. They end up spending the rest of their lives as blind beggars while Cinderella gets to lounge about in luxury at the prince's castle.

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Personally, I feel 'The Girl with No Hands' should've come in at number 1 because that sounds horrific!! I'm not surprised I've never heard of it, it's highly disturbing, almost horror movie material. And the fate of all the villains is so horrendous I actually feel a little sorry for them! In particular the Queen in Snow White and the nasty step sisters from Cinderella. Nobody deserves to have their eyes plucked out by pigeons.

This list got me to thinking though. Why has the content of these stories been dampened by modern censorship? What has changed in society that suddenly means we're refusing to expose our kids to life's nasties? Do we coddle our children too much? Would it make a difference to society if children were brought up being taught morals through the means of these very grim fairytales? I would love to study the difference in behaviour of children brought up with the modernised versions and the original versions - I wonder if their behaviour, both long term and short term, would differ? What do you think? Should we stick to modern happy endings or expose kids to these stories? I don't like to mention the 'R' word anywhere on the internet, but there were some pretty gruesome sections in the Bible, yet kids get brought up on that too as a means of teaching them right and wrong. Are these fairytales so different? (Not implying the Bible is a fairytale, I mean to compare them as a source of educating kids).

Your opinions are, as always, very welcome.


Link to original content:  listverse.com/2009/01/06/9-gru…
  • Mood: Terror
  • Listening to: No Doubt
  • Reading: Wise Man's Fear - Patrick Rothfuss
  • Playing: Borderlands 2
  • Drinking: Water
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:iconreimahowaido:
ReimaHowaido Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
Oh, and if I remember right...
Japan has a nice ending for everyone in their stories~
For example: The Red Ridinghood. The wolf gets to live happily ever after, learning that he shouldn't do bad things
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:iconreimahowaido:
ReimaHowaido Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
There is this one story that I have in one book: 'A fairytale for every day' or such.. The book has 'medium versions' of most of the stories
Many people are killed there; mostly because of someone failing to manage the kings/princess 'pleasures' or quests. Whatever

But yea. The story.
It's about a boy who was always crying. He didn't have a reason to cry, actually, he cried for fun and because he wanted to annoy others. His mom told him that if he wouldn't stop the crying, his eyes would go dry. The boy just kept crying as nothing would have happened
The next night an imp, or something similar, comes and takes away the boys eyes. They actually mention 'eye sockets' and such
The first part of the story ends there and your kid goes to sleep. Great. The story then continues with the boy going to search for his eyes. I can't remember perfectly... But still.. He meets a frog which he becomes friends with. In the end the frog sacrifices itself and gets eaten by the snake that guards the eyes. The boy gets his eyes back after he had searched for them trough the other eyes. ... I can't tell if the frog was memorised after that....

And there is another one~ Some kind of otter lake. There is a princess. She drops something in the lake. The otter queen comes and tells that she can give the item back if she would cry enough so the lakes surface would rise. She fails and is pulled under. A prince then tries to help the princess and he needs to cry too. He also fails and is pulled under. Then the mother of one of the 'kids' comes. She cries too. She cries as long that there is only blood coming from her eyes. She succedes in the end and both, the princess and prince, are brought back to life...
My bad memory can't really tell... ... Maybe the two were just crying all their 'fluids' out and became hollow and dead or something... *Shrug* This story had 2 parts if I remember right

Anyway, this was something Awesome to read
Enlightening and interesting~
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:iconhannah-alexander:
Hannah-Alexander Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
At least those stories have happy endings I suppose! Still not very nice images though. I swear some of these concepts would make awesome horror movies. Off track a bit but I was a little disturbed after watching Coraline - how she wanted to sew buttons into her eyes and how Coraline had to look for the ghost chidlren's eyes so they could be freed. I know it scared both my little sister and younger cousin.
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:iconreimahowaido:
ReimaHowaido Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
They definitely would make nice horror movies~
Hmmm... Haven't heard of that movie.... Maybe...
I bet~ I hate when something happens to eyes :C You can imagine... I sometimes have all these nightmares where my eye(s) somehow get messed up and such.... Luckily they have become rare..
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:iconsemantot:
Semantot Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I think I would like to share my childhood fairytales.

The pied piper, I heard the version (translated) where the children actually drown, because the pied piper felt deceived by the townsfolk. One handicapped boy were about to follow the pied piper, but he's too slow that after the pied piper finish drowning the other children, he forgot that one boy and just vanished into the woods. And that handicapped boy, turn back to the town after seeing there no ones around at the river and tell the story to the townsfolk, and this is the moral of story I learn, "Promise must be kept". I was 5 y/o then.

On the little mermaid, I've heard the ending where she was given a knife by some fish-witch (I don't quite recall her name, but she's not Ursula), whether to kill the prince or not, if the prince not marrying her, it was stated that since the mermaid tribe is mythical beast and shall not be known exist to mortal human. And mermaid have long life-span too. Ariel, who find the prince handsome, decided to broke the rules, no human contact. She seeks the fish-witch, let her to have a pair of legs. In return, the witch want her voice, *note that mermaid is beautiful creature that being told to have beautiful voice, luring sailor-man to their death*, so Ariel sacrifice her voice. She have legs but don't have voice to speak, so automatically, she was banished from the mermaid tribe, and the fish-witch warn her though, human shall not be trusted, so the witch gave Ariel a magical knife, which act to erase the memory of people about the existence of talking fish creature in the sea. The prince found her naked on the beach, brought her to his castle, they have party, and then the prince decided to marry, but with another woman because he thought that the woman saved him. Ariel want to tell the him the truth but cannot speak. So she cried. After the marriage, the prince set voyage, Ariel on board too, said, she must return to her home, actually want to kill the prince, but then she decided not to kill him, instead, jump into the ocean and become bubbles and disappeared/died, since she's nowhere to go. I still remember how hard I was crying after she ends like that. And I learned this, "Don't expect anything in return to our good deeds" or something like that. I heard this when I was 5 y/o.

and the little red riding hood. I guess the ending where she was eaten is the very one I heard when I was 6 and the teacher told us that not to disobey our mom advice or you'll end up like the red riding hood. It's sort of curse or the like, because mother's words is a prayer, in our society.
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:iconhannah-alexander:
Hannah-Alexander Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That's a slightly different version of The Little Mermaid than I've heard! Very interesting and morbid. I always feel sorry for Ariel. All your variations are very interesting :)
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:iconsemantot:
Semantot Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
why the pied piper felt deceived? because the townsfolk originally agrees to pay him a sum of golds if he successfully shoo the vermin out.
When he finished his job, the pied piper asked for the promised gold, but the townsfolk laughed at him. he got angry and decide to give the townsfolk a lesson. At night, the pied piper play the pipe and draws the children out, to follow him... and it continues as I've mentioned before.
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:iconsemantot:
Semantot Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
actually i forgot this, the handicapped boy saw the children drown that he turn back to the town, he's slow that the townsfolk too late to rescue the drowned children.
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:iconyourautumn:
yourautumn Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
Oh. One of Criminal Minds' episodes was probably inspired by the Girl with No Hands :wow:
But in the episode, the mother was the one who chopped of her daughter's hand to make her look 'ugly', or undesirable :(
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:iconawesomeponytail:
AwesomePonyTail Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This is really interesting. I kind of knew that modern fairytales were different than the original, but not to such a great extent. Wow, some of that stuff was really gruesome. I don't think i will ever read those stories again in the same way. :XD:
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:iconbundleofstring:
bundleofstring Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
From what I know, these olden day fairytales weren't meant for children at all. They were actually an entertainment value that the adults had when they chit chat. It was disney that started with the whole 'child-freindly' version, and that's when these fairytales were churned out in cleaner versions. But now we got the internet, and more adults can enjoy (?) the stories.
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:iconhannah-alexander:
Hannah-Alexander Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I had this discussion with someone else a little further back in the comments, but it basically depends which version of the fairytale we're talking about. For example, the Grimm fairytales were originally for children, literally called 'Children's Tales', but they were deemed unfit for kids and over the years were repeatedly republished as watered down editions. As for proper original fairytales (as Grimm bros simply adapted older works most of the time) I couldn't say who they were aimed at; I imagine a mixture of the both.
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:iconhitokiri-ayame:
Hitokiri-Ayame Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I took a Children's Lit class and one section of the course was all about fairytales. We discussed this very topic after reading all the original fairytales and then comparing them to the Disney versions we all know. We were told that the original tales were meant for children- as a means of teaching them lessons and scaring them into obeying rules and their parents.

I have heard of the original Little Mermaid (and there's even an anime movie that follows this original storyline). It always makes me sad for Ariel. The most shocking one to me is the original Sleeping Beauty- that one horrified me the most.
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:iconsascha90:
Sascha90 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Student Digital Artist
I remember awhile ago reading a Grimm fairy tale titled 'Hans the Hedgehog'.
It was about a couple who wanted a child, to the point where the husband prayed for a son "even if he was a hedgehog". His prayer is answered and, ironically, the child is a hedgehog from the head to his waist. They name him Hans, and eight years later, the husband asks him what he wants from the fair.
Hans replies that he wants bagpipes, and when he is given them, he asks for a rooster to ride upon so that he can find a way of life. He becomes a keeper of pigs and spends his freetime playing his bagpipes.
One day a lost king hears him playing and asks for Hans to help get him back home. Hans does so, but only if he is given whatever he first lays eyes upon at the castle. When they reach the castle, the first thing Hans sees is the king's daughter.
The king refuses to give the princess over to him, but Hans forces him to hand her over. However, due to the king breaking his promise, Hans strips the princess of her clothing and pierces her with his quills until she bleeds before sending her back to her kingdom.
Later, another king is lost, and Hans once more offers to lead him back home in return for whatever he first lays eyes upon. Once again, Hans sees the princess, but this time the king honors his promise and the princess does so as well. Hans promises that his quills will not hurt the princess, and that on his wedding night, a great fire should be lit.
On that night, Hans removes his hedgehog skin, and four servants burn it. After this is accomplished, Hans becomes a human man and lives happily ever after with the princess.

While it does have the stereotypical happy ending, the fate of the first princess is pretty brutal. She is stripped naked, pricked with hedgehog quills until she bleeds, and then sent back home without her clothing!
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:iconfifi-kun:
Fifi-kun Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Was this the same princess?
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:iconsascha90:
Sascha90 Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2012  Student Digital Artist
There were two separate princesses, each from what I presume to be different kingdoms. The daughter of the dishonest king was pricked by the hedgehog, while the honest king's daughter married him and had no trouble.
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:iconfifi-kun:
Fifi-kun Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Oh okay, thank you. This was very enlightening!
Thank you!:aww:
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:iconsascha90:
Sascha90 Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Student Digital Artist
You're quite welcome! ^^
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:iconfifi-kun:
Fifi-kun Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
do you know anymore fairytales?
Reply
:iconsascha90:
Sascha90 Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2012  Student Digital Artist
I know another one, though I'm not sure who published it.
It's the story of a merchant's daughter who becomes married to a count named Bluebeard. Her brothers advise her not to marry him, but she does not listen. Both brothers however, vow that if she summons them, they will come to her aid.
The girl is loved by Bluebeard, who gives her gifts of jewels and wine to show his affection, and one day entrusts her with the keys to the castle. He explains which key is for what room, stating that she may go to any room except for the one the last key unlocks, which is his chamber.
She uses all of the keys, except for the last one, and, because of her curiosity, unlocks Bluebeard's chamber. Inside, she sees the dead corpses of women hanging from the ceiling dressed in bridal gowns and realizes that she has married a murderer.
Knowing that she would be his next victim, she rides out to the countryside and asks a farmer to send word to her brothers to save her.
When she returns to the castle, she notices that the key is bleeding and tries to clean it off. Unable to stop the bleeding, she hid the key in a jewelry box, hoping that when her husband returned from his trip, he would not notice it's disappearance. However, when Bluebeard returns, he asks her for the key, and when she doesn't hand it to him, he drags her with him to her chamber. She takes the key from the jewelry box and gives it to him, and he then takes her to his chamber.
There he explains that he must kill mortal brides, and that any who see must be killed as well. Bluebeard then commands the girl to dress in her bridal gown, allowing her to return to her chamber to dress. She stalls for time, slowly changing into her wedding dress, before Bluebeard reappears, telling her to not delay.
The girl refuses to move from her window, and Bluebeard looks out to see two horsemen, the girl's brothers, galloping toward his castle. The brothers kill the count, then ride away with their sister back home.
Sorry, long post is looong.
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:iconfifi-kun:
Fifi-kun Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
It's okay.. it contains a story after all.
I do remember this tale about the rooms... I recall hearing/reading it somewhere. It's so eerie and interesting all at once...
Thank you very much! :aww:
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:iconhannah-alexander:
Hannah-Alexander Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That poor princess! I doubt it was even her fault! I actually find the image of the hedgehog removing its skin quite grotesque, but as a kid I probably would've imagined it coming off like a onsie zipper suit or something, and there being a handsome man underneath! That's a relatively nice fairytale, as they come. Thank you for sharing :)
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:iconsascha90:
Sascha90 Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2012  Student Digital Artist
You're quite welcome! ^^
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:iconcursedfreak:
CursedFreak Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I was amazed by many of these original fairytales. Sleeping Beauty particulary shocked me. The macabre artist in me Thanks you for sharing!
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:iconhannah-alexander:
Hannah-Alexander Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Haha, that's okay. As an artist I actually find it inspiring! Maybe I'll do a horrendous 'real fairytales' series? Might be a bit too gruesome though!
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:iconlukkistarr:
LukkiStarr Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Student Digital Artist
This is not contributing much to the discussion, just my own musings. I think most of these tales are from a time when fairies were considered to be baby eating monsters. To me it makes sense that along with the change of image for fairies, how we understand the term "fairytale" has also changed.

I'm not saying that's the reason it happened, just something I found curious. Could be the other way too, tales changing first and fairies after them. Unless I'm seriously mixing fairies and elves together...

~Lukki
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:iconhannah-alexander:
Hannah-Alexander Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That's a really interesting thought, and you're completely right! Fairies were considered primarily bad and, perhaps more importantly, real and something to be feared. I never thought of that :)
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:iconmariosonicanimefan:
Mariosonicanimefan Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Parents now are really mixing up something nowadays.What Children should and should not hear.The children in my country already know how to use censored words like crazy when they're only 8 years old and can handle dark endings like the ones in the original fairytales when they're at 6 years old.So really,right now telling them fairytales that have people splitting in half,dead corpses and people getting their eyes plucked out by birds is just the children's way of saying "I hate happy endings,they're boring.Tell me a gory story".Besides,now the kids are talking about Slender man and how he might be real.Hell they even play games like minecraft,world of Warcraft and even Slender.So really just in my own conclusion is,the Children just want more excitement.Like say,zombie apocalypse happens and then bring out a gun and act badass.So really they're just saying "Bring me gory stories or I'll go on YouTube and watch paranormal activity or something like that" and if you ask,yes kids in my country watch Paranormal activity.
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:iconhannah-alexander:
Hannah-Alexander Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I think kids all over the world will watch horror movies and play horror games. That's how it's been since the internet came about. I think we've entered a new generation where kids are exposed to much darker things at an early age, so yes, perhaps these fairytales will not make an impact on children anymore.
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:iconmariosonicanimefan:
Mariosonicanimefan Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah.Heck you can tell them something that's gory and then they might say "TELL ME MORE!!!!!!".Hell they even know "The ring" already.
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:iconmami02:
Mami02 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
I think that the reception differs from culture to culture, and I do believe there are certain groups of people in the world to whom the gruesome versions are a natural thing. I think the way theyre told, that is the tone is quite important. Well, since theyre bedtime stories, from my own experience as a kid, everything was told to me in a matter-of-fact manner, so it was no big deal. They were stories heard for pleasure, and we listen to them because we want to be entertained, and not listened for critical analysis. On a more personal level, as a kid I didn't mind the Disney versions, but now as an adult, I prefer hearing the original versions of everything. But the bottomline is, as adults we are more, what shall I say, "worldly wise", so are more sensitive to the small details.
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:iconhannah-alexander:
Hannah-Alexander Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I agree with you, I think tone is very important. If it's read in a scary manner, or even in a threatening manner (ie. be good or this will happen to you!) then it will in turn become scary. If they're treated as stories maybe it wont frighten the child as much.
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:iconmami02:
Mami02 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
well, then let me say I am the living proof of this, Lol :D . The folktales of my people, the Mizo if analyzed like that, are filled with gruesome stories : witches sucking children's brains out, bestiality etc. etc, and mind you, none of them are cut or modified to this day. But as a child, my grandmother and aunt used to tell me at bedtime. But I don't remember ever being scared or disturbed by them (maybe this isn't true for everyone), but it definitely is, for me :nod:
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:iconazeilarose:
AzeilaRose Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
When I was a child my mother read me an illustrated story of Rumpelstiltskin where instead of ripping himself in half, he throws a tantrum. He's so upset he jumps up and down in anger, and breaks through the floor, falling to his death. They illustrated his mangled corpse sticking out from the fallen floorboards! It was gruesome!
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:iconhannah-alexander:
Hannah-Alexander Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That's the version I was read except Rumpelstiltskin still didn't die! I'm sure he just threw a tantrum and then ran away 'never to be seen again' or something. Ew can't believe they illustrated that! Gross!
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:icontsandere:
tsandere Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012
It's true that those fairy tales are gruesome when you put them that way, and it's definitely true that many of the original fairy tales were quite dark.
However, you can't really say that those gruesome endings are the "original". For most fairy tales, no-one really knows what the original story is, because there are so many different versions.
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:iconhannah-alexander:
Hannah-Alexander Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm sure they're not all the originals, I used that word for simplicity's sake. I know Grimm added a lot of the gruesome parts to the fairytales, for instance, but I'm merely referring to them as originals based on the difference between them and today's adaptions.
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:icontsandere:
tsandere Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012
Fair enough :)
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:iconendorell-taelos:
Endorell-Taelos Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012   General Artist
I don't know if I am much of a fan of Happy Ever After Fairytales, something about dark Fairytales drives me closer to them to like them a whole lot more.
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:iconhixateez:
Hixateez Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I think the original Rapunzel story involved some nice stuff like the prince falling to a rose bush and having his eyes popped by the thorns... Though I have no idea how I learned this. Maybe I'm mistaken.

But this just proves that most stories involving women in the past were about sex. I've heard that even the softer, censored and newer versions (of course still long before Disney and such) were just roundabout ways to tell about a girl's sexual awakening, like the Beauty of the Beast or versions of the Sleeping Beauty.

I agree with many others here:nod: That children of our day shoud have their happy ends and not be forced adult material on them until they're developed anough to understand things like that. And it of course depends on each individual. No one matures at the same rate or handles horror and stuff just like their friend.
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:iconsemantot:
Semantot Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, indeed, I've heard of this version when I was 7 y/o. Rapunzel. The prolongue was most very same of the version, skips forward, then the witch happen to know the prince met Rapunzel occasionally, and then decided later, she'll cut the hair on the next prince-Rapunzel secret meeting, which happened when the Prince decided to take Rapunzel away from the tower. On that day, the witch cut Rapunzel's long hair when the prince was halfway climbing the hair, the prince drop onto bed of thorns and bleeds his eyes then he became blind. I've forgot this part story gap, but eventually, Rapunzel kills the witch and she escaped the tower and found the prince. It was Rapunzel's tears got some kind of magic that healed the prince's eyes and then they married, happily ever after.
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:iconhixateez:
Hixateez Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Alright, so this is how the story goes:nod: It makes some sense, actually, that Rapunzel'd have some healing power originally. I always wondered if Disney might've gotten that idea from somewhere, though they couldäve just made it up.
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:iconsemantot:
Semantot Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Rapunzel was indeed have healing powers in the story i read, years ago. I think Disney retained the healing power and the magical long hair. but twisted it somewhere. Never heard of the magical flower though.
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:iconhixateez:
Hixateez Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah, me neither.
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:iconskarlet-pumpernickel:
The problem with censorship with children is that people think kids are pussies. But to listen to any child talk or play and you can tell they can be pretty sadistic bastards.
I think its also because we see children as innocent when sometimes they're just naive. Also there's different sorts of innocence its not all pretty ponies and unicorns, innocence can be malicious and cruel. Innocent has come to mean cute and small but thats not necessarily the case.
I think what a lot of people are mixing up is what children shouldn't hear and what children can't deal with. sure its harder for children to deal with some abstract emotions and concepts, and they shouldn't be subjected to others because their brains haven't developed to process it in a physiologically healthy manner. But on the whole people underestimate children and they should be trusted enough to hear original forms of stories.
Wow that went on forever, sorry D:
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:iconescapeingrunaway:
EscapeingRunaway Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012  Student Writer
Reading these to five and six year olds depending on kid is not a very good idea but at nine or ten I think it's okay.
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:icondevilchild93:
Devilchild93 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012
Love the gruesome versions.
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:iconvalkenhayndornez:
ValkenhaynDornez Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is really just my opinion, so I hope I don't offend anyone with it.

I imagine children raised on these versions of these common fairy tales would probably be more jaded to society. While this would unltimately be a safer course of action for most, I also feel that the innocence of a child is something that shouldn't be corrupted on purpose. I've seen way to many children that had an aged look in their eyes, and when it's a young child that looks at everything with a suspicious eye, it makes me want to cry. No need t rush the inevitable, right?
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:iconking-wasted:
King-Wasted Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012   Digital Artist
I think people coddle their kids too much nowadays... Fairy tales aren't about entertaining kids or teaching them morals. They put forth a worst case scenario. With Hansel and Gretel, specifically an inherent fear: being abandoned by their parents. They're a means to allow children to work through their fears in a safe environment.
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:iconbrandi3981:
brandi3981 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
i saw these on funny jokes there is a guy there who's jokes are all count downs from cracked
also if you watched sleeping beauty maleficent only TOLD phillip she'd keep him 100 years the release him to wake aurora to TAUNT him he the whole kingdom just slept til morning
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